The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (DVD, 2009, 2-Disc Set, Paramount Centennial Collection)

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Product Details

Overview -

Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

Features

Closed Caption; Disc 1: Commentary by filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich, along with his archival recordings with John Ford and James Stewart; Selected scene commentary with intro by Dan Ford along with his archival recordings with John Ford, James Stewart and Lee Marvin; Disc 2: The Size of Legends, the Soul of Myth: 7-part featurette; Theatrical trailer; galleries: Lobby cards; Production; John Ford; Publicity

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
1. Chapter 1 [13:11]
2. Chapter 2 [5:04]
3. Chapter 3 [10:34]
4. Chapter 4 [8:20]
5. Chapter 5 [4:27]
6. Chapter 6 [8:17]
7. Chapter 7 [11:10]
8. Chapter 8 [5:44]
9. Chapter 9 [6:26]
10. Chapter 10 [4:57]
11. Chapter 11 [9:24]
12. Chapter 12 [8:35]
13. Chapter 13 [7:24]
14. Chapter 14 [11:54]
15. Chapter 15 [3:17]

Editorial Reviews

Like Pontius Pilate, director John Ford asks "What is truth?" in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance--but unlike Pilate, Ford waits for an answer. The film opens in 1910, with distinguished and influential U.S. senator Ransom Stoddard (James Stewart) and his wife Hallie (Vera Miles) returning to the dusty little frontier town where they met and married twenty-five years earlier. They have come back to attend the funeral of impoverished "nobody" Tom Doniphon (John Wayne). When a reporter asks why, Stoddard relates a film-long flashback. He recalls how, as a greenhorn lawyer, he had run afoul of notorious gunman Liberty Valance (Lee Marvin), who worked for a powerful cartel which had the territory in its clutches. Time and again, "pilgrim" Stoddard had his hide saved by the much-feared but essentially decent Doniphon. It wasn't that Doniphon was particularly fond of Stoddard; it was simply that Hallie was in love with Stoddard, and Doniphon was in love with Hallie and would do anything to assure her happiness, even if it meant giving her up to a greenhorn. When Liberty Valance challenged Stoddard to a showdown, everyone in town was certain that the greenhorn didn't stand a chance. Still, when the smoke cleared, Stoddard was still standing, and Liberty Valance lay dead. On the strength of his reputation as the man who shot Valance, Stoddard was railroaded into a political career, in the hope that he'd rid the territory of corruption. Stoddard balked at the notion of winning an election simply because he killed a man-until Doniphon, in strictest confidence, told Stoddard the truth: It was Doniphon, not Stoddard, who shot down Valance. Stoddard was about to reveal this to the world, but Doniphon told him not to. It was far more important in Doniphon's eyes that a decent, honest man like Stoddard become a major political figure; Stoddard represented the "new" civilized west, while Doniphon knew that he and the West he represented were already anachronisms. Thus Stoddard went on to a spectacular political career, bringing extensive reforms to the state, while Doniphon faded into the woodwork. His story finished, the aged Stoddard asks the reporter if he plans to print the truth. The reporter responds by tearing up his notes. "This is the West, sir, " the reporter explains quietly. "When the legend becomes fact, print the legend." Dismissed as just another cowboy opus at the time of its release, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance has since taken its proper place as one of the great Western classics. It questions the role of myth in forging the legends of the West, while setting this theme in the elegiac atmosphere of the West itself, set off by the aging Stewart and Wayne. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi All Movie Guide

Specifications

Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

UPC: 097361423449

Studio: Paramount

MPAA Rating: NR   Contains:Mild Violence,Western Violence

Summary: Like Pontius Pilate, director John Ford asks "What is truth?" in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance--but unlike Pilate, Ford waits for an answer. The film opens in 1910, with distinguished and influential U.S. senator Ransom Stoddard (James Stewart) and his wife Hallie (Vera Miles) returning to the dusty little frontier town where they met and married twenty-five years earlier. They have come back to attend the funeral of impoverished "nobody" Tom Doniphon (John Wayne). When a reporter asks why, Stoddard relates a film-long flashback. He recalls how, as a greenhorn lawyer, he had run afoul of notorious gunman Liberty Valance (Lee Marvin), who worked for a powerful cartel which had the territory in its clutches. Time and again, "pilgrim" Stoddard had his hide saved by the much-feared but essentially decent Doniphon. It wasn't that Doniphon was particularly fond of Stoddard; it was simply that Hallie was in love with Stoddard, and Doniphon was in love with Hallie and would do anything to assure her happiness, even if it meant giving her up to a greenhorn. When Liberty Valance challenged Stoddard to a showdown, everyone in town was certain that the greenhorn didn't stand a chance. Still, when the smoke cleared, Stoddard was still standing, and Liberty Valance lay dead. On the strength of his reputation as the man who shot Valance, Stoddard was railroaded into a political career, in the hope that he'd rid the territory of corruption. Stoddard balked at the notion of winning an election simply because he killed a man-until Doniphon, in strictest confidence, told Stoddard the truth: It was Doniphon, not Stoddard, who shot down Valance. Stoddard was about to reveal this to the world, but Doniphon told him not to. It was far more important in Doniphon's eyes that a decent, honest man like Stoddard become a major political figure; Stoddard represented the "new" civilized west, while Doniphon knew that he and the West he represented were already anachronisms. Thus Stoddard went on to a spectacular political career, bringing extensive reforms to the state, while Doniphon faded into the woodwork. His story finished, the aged Stoddard asks the reporter if he plans to print the truth. The reporter responds by tearing up his notes. "This is the West, sir, " the reporter explains quietly. "When the legend becomes fact, print the legend." Dismissed as just another cowboy opus at the time of its release, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance has since taken its proper place as one of the great Western classics. It questions the role of myth in forging the legends of the West, while setting this theme in the elegiac atmosphere of the West itself, set off by the aging Stewart and Wayne. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide

Category: Western

Awards: Best Black and White Costume Design – Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Features: cc
Disc 1: Commentary by filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich, along with his archival recordings with John Ford and James Stewart
Selected scene commentary with intro by Dan Ford along with his archival recordings with John Ford, James Stewart and Lee Marvin
Disc 2: The Size of Legends, the Soul of Myth: 7-part featurette
Theatrical trailer
galleries: Lobby cards
Production
John Ford
Publicity

Reviews (1)

  • Anonymous
    10 years, 3 months ago at Barnes & Noble

    5.0 / 5.0

    This is a must see movie. It defines democracy and it's struggle to survive when the going got tough. It makes you admire tough guys (on the outside AND on the inside) once again. Wayne, Stewart and Marvin are legends in the setting AND in real life. Makes me want to learn all about the Wild Wild West again. It's got great humor and sadness too. Loved seeing Lee Van Cleef. Great movie for all ages.