Real Women Have Curves (DVD, 2005)

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Product Details

Overview -

Real Women Have Curves

Features

Closed Caption; Additional scene - "Ana, One Year Later"; Two audio commentaries; Two featurettes; cast & crew bios, and more

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Real Women Have Curves
1. Last Day [9:24]
2. Like Mother... [5:45]
3. All for You [5:50]
4. "Find Your Own Gold" [5:26]
5. Novelas [4:10]
6. I Need You More Than Ever [5:21]
7. "What I Do Best" [3:56]
8. Help Yourself [4:17]
9. Night Out [:02]
10. Whatever it Takes [3:57]
11. The Right Size [4:43]
12. "All the Way to New York?" [4:55]
13. See Me [3:38]
14. Pregnant Pause [4:27]
15. Real Women [2:34]
16. Blessings [5:30]
17. Credits [7:55]

Editorial Reviews

A modestly produced independent film that won the Audience Award at Sundance Film Festival 2002, Real Women Have Curves is an enormously entertaining and uplifting coming-of-age story. Refreshingly free of the glamour girls who populate most of today’s teen movies, Patricia Cardoso’s exuberant comedy-drama stars 18-year-old screen newcomer America Ferrera as Ana, a Mexican-American girl with intelligence, ambition, and a healthy self-image, notwithstanding her Rubenesque proportions. Ana, who’s secretly dating an Anglo boy named Jimmy (Brian Sites), wants to attend college but is pushed by her immigrant parents to work in the dress shop run by her older sister. Ferrera is remarkable in her film debut: natural, unforced, and passionate, she brings both maturity and joie de vivre to the role. She is never less than thoroughly convincing, and the same can be said of Lupe Ontiveros, who plays the overweight mother who can’t forgive herself for becoming fat and wishes Ana felt the same way about herself. Real Women comes to grips with the issue of body image in a celebratory, rational way, and in that respect it provides a real breath of fresh air. The film also focuses on the hopes and aspirations of second-generation children of immigrants whose pursuit of the American Dream occasionally clashes with the older generation's culture and values. Ana’s struggle to assert herself is depicted cleverly but honestly, without resorting to clichés. And that’s what makes Cardoso’s little movie such a delightfully invigorating exercise. Ed Hulse, Barnes & Noble

Specifications

Real Women Have Curves

Theatrical Release Date: 2002 10 18 (USA - Limited)

UPC: 026359297229

Studio: HBO Home Video

MPAA Rating: PG13   Contains:Adult Language,Sexual Situations,Watch With Your Teen

Summary: In this independent drama, Ana (America Ferrera) is a bright and ambitious 18-year-old Latina who has just graduated from high school in East Los Angeles. Ana wants to broaden her horizons and go on to college, but her mother Carmen (Lupe Ontiveros) has other ideas; Ana's older sister Estela (Ingrid Oliu) oversees the family business, a dress factory, and Carmen has decided that Ana should put higher education on hold and go to work as a seamstress. When Estela loses four employees in a week, Ana reluctantly agrees to take a job at the factory to help her out, while she applies for college scholarships without her mother's knowledge. Ana's job at the dress factory proves to be a real eye opener; she gains a new respect for Estela's business acumen, but is also appalled by the low wages and unpleasant working conditions that are part and parcel of the garment industry. While Ana is not unattractive, she carries more than a few extra pounds, a subject her mother mentions at every available opportunity, and as Ana encourages her co-workers at the shop to stand up for themselves and gain a greater perspective of their own worth, she takes a long hard look at her own self-image. Real Women Have Curves won the Audience Award at the 2002 Sundance Film Festival, while actresses America Ferrera and Lupe Ontiveros received a Special Jury Prize at the same festival for their performances. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

Category: Comedy Drama

Awards: Dramatic Audience Award – Sundance Film Festival Special Dramatic Jury Prize for Acting – Sundance Film Festival Special Dramatic Jury Prize for Acting – Sundance Film Festival Special Mention for Excellence in Filmmaking – National Board of Review Best Debut Performance – Independent Spirit Awards

Features: ccAdditional scene - "Ana, One Year Later"; Two audio commentaries; Two featurettes; cast & crew bios, and more

Reviews (5)

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago at Barnes & Noble

    5.0 / 5.0

    This was a great movie that showed that there are people out there that don't look at just looks. Plus how one girl can get through her hard life. I feel that i can really connect to this story and i can't wait to watch it again and again.

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago at Barnes & Noble

    4.0 / 5.0

    I loved this movie. Not only did I feel connected to the main character, I also felt more comfortable about my body after watching this. I definitely recommend this movie!

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago at Barnes & Noble

    5.0 / 5.0

    One of the best movies I've seen. cast that comes across as real people. Emphasizes the fact that beauty comes from the entire person, not just the package. A definite must buy for me

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago at Barnes & Noble

    5.0 / 5.0

    I saw this movie with a chicana friend and being white, I was nervous about laughing at inappropriate times or not getting the nuances. I have to say my friend and I were laughing so hard we cried. Although it is about a Mexican family, the issues addressed cross racial and ethnic lines. This needs to be seen by every woman (and man) regardless of race or ethnic background. The movie celebrates beauty regardless of size and lets women know, being beautiful does not mean one has to be a size four, white, and blond.

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago at Barnes & Noble

    4.0 / 5.0

    I was so happy to see a woman who was constantly becoming unsure of her appearance, her goals, her intelligence actually forge ahead with her education despite what everyone said. We all know we should do certain things in our lives to make us happy, but most of the time, we don't carry it out. In this movie, painfully walking away from her mother, she carried on with her life--and probably a truly happy one at that.