Cake Art : Simplified Step-by-Step Instructions and Illustrated Techniques for the Home Baker to Create Showstopping Cakes and Cupcakes (2008, Hardcover)

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Product Details

Overview If you have a creative spirit and want to try your hand at cake and cupcake decorating, Cake Art is for you. Chefs from the CIA's prestigious Baking and Pastry faculty describe the various techniques and provide easy-to-follow instructions so the home baker can create beautiful cakes and cupcakes. Cake decorating is an activity that can be enjoyed by everyone and children can help with 8 of the 27 projects included in Cake Art.

Specifications

  • ISBN-13: 9780867309225
  • Publisher: Lebhar-Friedman Books
  • Publication date: 2/25/2008
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 1,178,064
  • Product dimensions: 9.47 (w) x 10.42 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Reviews (2)

  • Prille
    4 years ago at Barnes & Noble

    5.0 / 5.0

    A book filled with a variety of projects for cakes and cupcakes. The book gives step by step instructions paired with the illustrations. Good illustrations from whimsy to elegant. I highly recommend it for a self starter with a sense of adventure. After completing one cake, you want to try them all! And then.. be creative. Design your own!

  • Anonymous
    5 years, 11 months ago at Barnes & Noble

    4.0 / 5.0

    The Culinary Institute of America has come out with yet another beautiful and useful book: Cake Art. If you've ever had an interest in interest in creating dramatic desserts, this is a volume for you, although I wouldn't call this a book for beginners. It starts with an overview of tools and components that I found myself wishing had a bit more to it: more individual photos of each item rather than trying to discern elements in group photos, more explanation of what to do and how to do it, and more tips. However, it's not a paralyzing shortcoming, as you can get some of that from browsing online retailers, stores, and catalogs. Where the book really shines is in the techniques and instructions. For example, on page 31 there is a photo with three spoons of meringue, one stiff, one medium, and one soft-peaked. There are formulas for both hard and soft ganaches (Books often don't explicitly set the two side-by-side, and there's a big difference in the resulting texture and use.) as well as modeling chocolate. You can learn to make ribbons and coverings of fondant. Pipe a flower from buttercream (with a tip on how to reconstitute the mixture if it separates) or mold it from molding chocolate, marzipan, or fondant. In short, there is a lot to learn. And that might be the big problem for many would-be cake decorators. Some of these techniques require practice, and a lot of it. If you go directly to the projects and try to work your way backward into the techniques, the results are going to be disappointing. If you want to undertake a given project (which, smartly, tell you how far in advance - weeks in some cases - to start different parts), then read through, write down the techniques that are necessary, and practice well in advance. You don't really think that pastry chefs start on this level of work their first day of class, do you? However, if you are willing to spend some time, this book should be well worth your while.